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Debugging with GDB

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D.3 Stop Reply Packets

The `C', `c', `S', `s' and `?' packets can receive any of the below as a reply. In the case of the `C', `c', `S' and `s' packets, that reply is only returned when the target halts. In the below the exact meaning of `signal number' is poorly defined. In general one of the UNIX signal numbering conventions is used.

`SAA'
AA is the signal number

`TAAn...:r...;n...:r...;n...:r...;'

AA = two hex digit signal number; n... = register number (hex), r... = target byte ordered register contents, size defined by REGISTER_RAW_SIZE; n... = `thread', r... = thread process ID, this is a hex integer; n... = (`watch' | `rwatch' | `awatch', r... = data address, this is a hex integer; n... = other string not starting with valid hex digit. GDB should ignore this n..., r... pair and go on to the next. This way we can extend the protocol.

`WAA'

The process exited, and AA is the exit status. This is only applicable to certain targets.

`XAA'

The process terminated with signal AA.

`NAA;t...;d...;b... (obsolete)'

AA = signal number; t... = address of symbol _start; d... = base of data section; b... = base of bss section. Note: only used by Cisco Systems targets. The difference between this reply and the `qOffsets' query is that the `N' packet may arrive spontaneously whereas the `qOffsets' is a query initiated by the host debugger.

`OXX...'

XX... is hex encoding of ASCII data. This can happen at any time while the program is running and the debugger should continue to wait for `W', `T', etc.


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