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Gcal 3.01

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3.1.1.4 Fixed date options

`-v argument'
`--date-variable=argument'
Define global date variable which is visible in all referenced resource files (see section 5.1.8 Date variables). The option argument must either be a valid single date variable definition or a (`:') colon-connected series of definitions.

A date variable name dvar consists of a single, case-insensitive letter(21). In a definition, this name is trailed by the assignment operator character `=', and the numerical values of month mm (or a short, three characters month name, e.g. `Jan', `Feb'...) and day dd, this variable has to store(22).

For example:

`--date-variable=a=1127:c=a' respectively
`-v a=1127:c=a'
stores the 27th November into the global date variable a and into the global date variable c.

`--export-date-variables'
Causes the export of local date variables from one resource file to another resource file. See section 5.1.8 Date variables, for more details.

`-r argument'
`--text-variable=argument'
Define global text variable which is visible in all referenced resource files (see section 5.1.9 Text variables). The option argument must either be a valid single text variable definition or a (`:') colon-connected series of definitions.

A text variable name tvar consists of the `$' prefix and a single, case-insensitive letter.

A text variable is defined as follows:

Indeed, Gcal executes external commands only if the `--execute-command' option is given at program start-up. See section Fixed date option `--execute-command', for more details.

The text which appears at the right side of one of the valid assignment operator characters may reference names of already defined global text variables. These references are converted to the according textual values just before the assignment is performed by Gcal.

A global text variable is defined with an empty contents in case no text appears at the right side of one of the valid assignment operator characters.

For example:

`--text-variable=$a=foo:$c=$a' respectively
`-r $a=foo:$c=$a'
stores the `foo' text into the global text variable $a and into the global text variable $c.

`--text-variable=$a\:foo:$c?bar' respectively
`-r $a\:foo:$c?bar'
stores the uninterpreted output of the foo command into the global text variable $a, and the interpreted output of the bar command into the global text variable $c.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `:' separator character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\:'. If you need the `\:' characters themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\:'.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `$' prefix character ---in case this character itself is needed in the text-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\$'. If you need the `\$' characters themselves in the text, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\$'.

Each time a `_' (underscore) character is found in argument, this character is replaced by a real ` ' (space) character.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `_' (underscore) character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\_'. If you need the `\_' themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\_'.

`--export-text-variables'
Causes the export of local text variables from one resource file to another resource file. See section 5.1.9 Text variables, for more details.

`--adjust-value=argument'
Causes on the one hand, that the number given as argument to the `--adjust-value' option is used as reference altitude to calculate the rise and set times by the Sun and Moon oriented special texts. The option argument must be a rational number in range -90.0...+90.0, which declares the angle distance in decimal degrees from the center of astronomical object to the horizon. For example, you can detect the time when the center of the Sun or the Moon is 20.5 decimal degrees below the horizon if you use `--adjust-value=-20.5'.

And causes on the other hand, that the number that is given as argument is used as factor for computing the shadow length of a vertical pole by the Sun oriented special texts. The option argument must be a rational number in range 0.0...+90.0, which declares the shadow length. For example, you can detect the time when the shadow length of vertical pole is three and a half times longer than the shadow length that appears at astronomical noon if you use `--adjust-value=3.5'.

See section G.2.2.5 Sun data %[format]?argument special texts, and G.2.2.6 Moon data %[format]?argument special texts, for further information.

`--atmosphere=air-pressure[,temperature]'
Set the base data of the Earth's atmosphere that is necessary to calculate the amount of refraction(23), that is used by the Sun and Moon oriented special texts. The option argument consists of one or two rational numbers, which are separated by a `,' character. The first number denotes the air pressure in millibar, and the second number specifies the air temperature in degree Celsius. The default value for the air pressure is 1013.25 millibar, and the default value for the temperature is 15.0 degree Celsius. For example, if you use `--atmosphere=1010,10', you define atmospheric conditions as they are existing for an air pressure of 1010 millibar and a temperature of 10 degree Celsius. If you set an air pressure value less or equal zero, no atmospheric refraction will be respected by the Sun and Moon oriented special texts, as for example done by `--atmosphere=0'.

See section G.2.2.5 Sun data %[format]?argument special texts, and G.2.2.6 Moon data %[format]?argument special texts, for further information.

`--limit'
Causes when calculating the rise and set times by the Sun oriented special texts for high latitudes, that a rise or set event which possibly occurs on a previous or next day, is not displayed as occurring on the actual day as it is done by default. At high latitudes, i.e. above the solar Arctic Circle, it is fact that no, or more than one sunrise or sunset happens during a day at definite dates of the year. As a special text basically leads in a single, atomical output, even it should result in several output in reality, Gcal puts such an event on a previous or next day. Then, data represented in this manner could be misinterpreted very easily.

The following example is used to explain this. It calculates the time the astronomical twilight ends for the location Münster, Germany, during some days in May 2000, and that with and without the `--limit' option in each case:

 
$ gcal %20000506 -f/dev/null -cxl4+ \
>      -#'0*d1#999_%s9+5158+00738,120'
-| 
-| Sun, May   7th 2000: 23:52
-| Mon, May   8th 2000: 23:57
-| Tue, May   9th 2000: 00:01
-| Wed, May  10th 2000: 00:06
$ gcal %20000506 -f/dev/null -cxl4+ --limit \
>      -#'0*d1#999_%s9+5158+00738,120'
-| 
-| Sun, May   7th 2000: 23:52
-| Mon, May   8th 2000: 23:57
-| Tue, May   9th 2000: **:**
-| Wed, May  10th 2000: **:**

As one can see well in the above example, the output for the days since 9th May differs in that the times shown without the `--limit' option obviously exceeded the civil midnight time and actually cannot happen during these days, whereas no times are shown for the days since 9th May if the `--limit' option is used because the time circle is exceeded. Astronomically seen, it is the case that the end of the astronomical twilight is at 23:57 o'clock local time on 8th May, no end of astronomical twilight happens on 9th May because the center of the Sun's disk is always above 18 degrees (the reference altitude of the astronomical twilight) below a geometric horizon, but on 10th May at 00:01 o'clock local time, this reference altitude is passed again. Thus, the time that is detected for the 9th May has properly to be moved to the 10th May, et cetera, as it is expressed by the output that is created by using the `--limit' option.

See section G.2.2.5 Sun data %[format]?argument special texts, for further information.

`--cycle-end=argument'
Calculates the Sun and Moon oriented special texts that are dynamical, i.e. depending on the respective clocktime, for a series of clocktimes for the current day, i.e. determination is done for any time interval that can be individually defined by the user. Gcal is always put into such a cycle mode if the `--cycle-end' option is given at program start-up. The argument of the `--cycle-end' option is syntactically according to the argument which may be given to the `--time-offset' option, thus `t|@|[t|@][+|-]mmmm|hh:[mm]'. See section Calendar option `--time-offset=argument', for the detailed explanation of the preceding option argument. Thus, the `--cycle-end' option is used to fix the ending time of the time interval, whereas the `--time-offset' option is implicitly used to fix the starting time of the time interval, that is 0 o'clock by default(24).

If values for the time interval are given to both above mentioned options that fall short of 0 o'clock, these values are automatically set to 0 o'clock. If values for the time interval are given that exceed 23:39 o'clock, these values are automatically set to 23:59 o'clock.

The timestep value between the starting and the ending time of the time interval that is respected by Gcal is one minute by default. This value can at pleasure be changed by using the `--cycle-step' option. See section Fixed date option `--cycle-step=argument', for more details.

You should always keep in mind that the use of the cycle mode is efficient only if the current time of the time interval is also part of that resource file line that has to be evaluated in this manner. Otherwise, it is difficult to find out unobjectionably lateron when displaying the data and times, which Sun or Moon oriented value resulted in what time.

The following example shows how the topocentric elevation angle of the Sun for the location Münster, Germany, is calculated during two days in April 2000, and that for the time interval 12:00 o'clock until 12:05 o'clock local time in each case:

 
$ gcal %20000420 -Hno -f/dev/null -xdt -g::: \
>      --here='0*d1#999_%ot+00+000_:_%oa+5158+00738,120' \
>      --cycle-end=12:05 --time=12:00
-| 
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +12h00': +045d58'
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +12h01': +046d03'
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +12h02': +046d07'
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +12h03': +046d12'
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +12h04': +046d17'
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +12h05': +046d22'
-| :::
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +12h00': +046d18'
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +12h01': +046d23'
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +12h02': +046d28'
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +12h03': +046d32'
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +12h04': +046d37'
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +12h05': +046d42'

See section G.2.2.5 Sun data %[format]?argument special texts, and G.2.2.6 Moon data %[format]?argument special texts, for further information.

`--cycle-step=argument'
Changes the timestep value that is used between the starting and ending clocktime of the time interval, in which the Sun and Moon oriented special texts are calculated, that are dynamical, i.e. depending on the respective clocktime. See section Fixed date option `--cycle-end=argument', how to define such a time interval. Without the `--cycle-end' option, a `--cycle-step' option is completely ignored. It also does not enable Gcal's cycle mode. The argument of the `--cycle-step' option is by change syntactically according to the argument which may be given to the `--time-offset' option, and that relative time offset value references based on the actual local time and Universal time cannot be made, respectively. Gcal always uses the amount of the given timestep value. Thus, the template for the argument that may be given to the `--cycle-step' option is `[+|-]mmmm|hh:[mm]'. See section Calendar option `--time-offset=argument', for the detailed explanation of the preceding option argument.

The timestep value between the starting and the ending time of the time interval that is respected by Gcal is one minute by default.

The following example shows how the topocentric elevation angle of the Sun for the location Münster, Germany, is calculated during two days in April 2000, and that for the time interval 10:00 o'clock until 17:00 o'clock local time with a timestep value of one hour and 15 minutes in each case:

 
$ gcal %20000420 -Hno -f/dev/null -xdt -g::: \
>      --here='0*d1#999_%ot+00+000_:_%o*a+5158+00738,120' \
>      --cycle-end=10:00 --time=17:00 --cycle-step=1:15
-| 
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +10h45': +38.038
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +12h00': +45.962
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +13h15': +49.665
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +14h30': +47.882
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +15h45': +41.267
-| Thu, Apr  20th 2000: +17h00': +31.633
-| :::
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +10h45': +38.355
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +12h00': +46.299
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +13h15': +50.006
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +14h30': +48.198
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +15h45': +41.545
-| Fri, Apr  21st 2000: +17h00': +31.881

See section G.2.2.5 Sun data %[format]?argument special texts, and G.2.2.6 Moon data %[format]?argument special texts, for further information.

`--precise'
The astronomical data and times that are created by the Sun and Moon oriented special texts, and the geographical data that is created by the distance and course angle oriented special text, respectively, are displayed by using a higher precision, i.e. according to the mode or style of representation and the type of special text, decimal values are displayed with more decimal places, or output of the time seconds part or the arcseconds part.

See section G.2.2.5 Sun data %[format]?argument special texts, and G.2.2.6 Moon data %[format]?argument special texts, likewise G.2.2.4 Geographical distance and course angle %[format]bargument special text, for further information.

`--execute-command'
Causes on the one hand, that shell command %![argument] special texts are executed, and not displayed textually only. See section Shell command %![argument] special text, for more details. And causes on the other hand, that `tvar?[command]' and `tvar:[command]' text variable definitions is assigned the output of an external command, and not the text which contains the call of the external command. See section 5.1.9 Text variables, for further information.

`-D argument'
`--filter-day=argument'
Displays only those fixed dates, whose date is not excluded by the given argument. See section 5.1.2 Date part of a line, and likewise Exclusions without any argument %? special texts. The argument consists of one or more characters as used in the exclusion without any argument %? special text; but without the leading `%' character in each case.

For example, it is possible to induce Gcal to display only those fixed dates from the resource file `demo.rc' for the whole year which are legals holidays, and moreover, Saturdays or Sundays:

 
gcal -f demo.rc --year --filter-day=Rv

`-P argument'
`--filter-period=argument'
Displays only those fixed dates, whose date is not excluded by the given argument. See section 5.1.2 Date part of a line, and likewise Exclusions with date argument %?[date] special texts. The argument consists of one or more expressions as used in the exclusion with date argument %?[date] special text; but without the leading `%' character in each case. You can use more than one of these %?[date] expressions by connecting them with a `,' character.

For example, it is possible to induce Gcal to display only those fixed dates from the resource file `demo.rc' for the whole year which appear within the period of the 17th and the 20th of any month, and which appear on the 31st of any month.

 
gcal -f demo.rc -y -P i00000017#00000020,i00000031#00000031

`-I pattern'
`--filter-text=pattern'
Displays only those fixed dates, whose completely expanded text(25) is matched by the given pattern. See section 5.1.4 Text part of a line, and %?... special texts for text replacement. The pattern is a regular expression, as recognized by the Unix ed line-editor. See section E. Regular Expressions, for further information.

For example, it is possible to induce Gcal to display all fixed dates from the resource file `doctor.rc' for the current month, which are defined for dentists or oculists:

 
gcal -f doctor.rc --month -I "[dD]entist|[oO]culist"

Each time a `_' (underscore) character is found in the pattern argument, this character is replaced by a real ` ' (space) character.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `_' (underscore) character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\_'. If you need the `\_' characters themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\_'.

`--ignore-case'
Ignores all case distinctions in both the completely expanded text and the pattern of the `--filter-text=pattern' option. See section Fixed date option `--filter-text=pattern'.

`--revert-match'
Displays all those fixed dates, whose completely expanded text does not match the pattern of the `--filter-text=pattern' option. See section Fixed date option `--filter-text=pattern'.

`-c|C[-]'
`--today'
`--list-of-fixed-dates[=short|long]'
`--descending-fixed-dates[=short|long]'
Activate the fixed date function and display fixed date messages, if any.

`-c'
`--today'
`--list-of-fixed-dates=short'
Activate fixed date function (use standard resource file implicitly) and list all dates related to the actual system date (==today), sorted in ascending order. If no fixed dates related to the current day are found, no fixed date messages are displayed and the program is terminated with an error code. See section Error Code 1.

`-c-'
`--descending-fixed-dates=short'
Activate fixed date function (use standard resource file implicitly) and list all dates related to the actual system date (==today), sorted in descending order. If no fixed dates related to the current day are found, no fixed date messages are displayed and the program is terminated with an error code. See section Error Code 1.

`-C'
`--list-of-fixed-dates=long'
Activate fixed date function (use standard resource file implicitly) and list all dates related to the actual system date (==today), sorted in ascending order. If no fixed dates related to the current day are found, an "empty" fixed date message is displayed which is only consisting of the date.

`-C-'
`--descending-fixed-dates=long'
Activate fixed date function (use standard resource file implicitly) and list all dates related to the actual system date (==today), sorted in descending order. If no fixed dates related to the current day are found, an "empty" fixed date message is displayed which is only consisting of the date.

`-f|F name[+...]'
`--resource-file=name[+...]'
Activate fixed date function and use file name instead of the standard resource file. Then list all dates, sorted in ascending order which occur in the fixed date period. If no other fixed date period is specified, the actual system date (==today) is used for the fixed date period. If the option letter `f' of the short-style option is used and no dates related to the fixed date period are found in name, no fixed date messages are displayed and the program is terminated with an error code. See section Error Code 1. If the option letter `F' of the short-style option is used and no dates related to the fixed date period are found in name, an "empty" fixed date message is displayed which is only consisting of the date.

You can use more than one resource file name by connecting them with a `+' character, e.g.:

`--resource-file=./foo+xyz+/data/bar+$HOME/.gcalrc' resp.,
`-f ./foo+xyz+/data/bar+$HOME/.gcalrc'

respects all files given in the preceding argument by using a special file search mechanism. See section File searching mechanism, for more details. Use `/dev/null' to avoid the use of the standard resource file, useful for creating empty fixed date lists. If a single `-' character is given as file name, like `--resource-file=./foo+-+xyz' or `-F-', but not `-F -', Gcal reads and processes all input received from the standard input channel.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `+' separator character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\+'. If you need the `\+' characters themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\+'.

Each time a `_' (underscore) character is found in name, this character is replaced by a real ` ' (space) character.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `_' (underscore) character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\_'. If you need the `\_' characters themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\_'.

`-# line'
`--here=line'
Activate fixed date function and use the line argument together with the standard resource file respectively additional resource files. The line argument has to be a valid line as it may occur in a Gcal resource file (see section 5.1.1 Structure of resource file), and is always evaluated last after the processing of all resource files, so dealing with references to exported local date or text variables is enabled. This option may be given multiple and it will be processed exactly in the given order. All dates are listed, sorted in ascending order which occur in the fixed date period. If no other fixed date period is specified, the actual system date (==today) is used for the fixed date period. If no dates related to the fixed date period are found in the line, no fixed date messages are displayed and the program is terminated with an error code. See section Error Code 1.

For example, the call:

 
gcal -# "0*d1su#99su.7 ^%Z" --here="#include " -y

causes the implicit processing of the standard resource file just before the further resource file line `0*d1su#99su.7 ^%Z' and following `#include <foo>' are processed, and that as if these lines were a physical part of the standard resource file.

Each time a `_' (underscore) character is found in line, this character is replaced by a real ` ' (space) character.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `_' (underscore) character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\_'. If you need the `\_' characters themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\_'.

Please note:
If the short-style option `-c' and/or its modifiers `t|[w|m|y[+|-]', or the short-style option `-f' is/are given in upper-case, e.g.:

 
-C
-F foo.bar
-CeT
-c-aW+
-CeaxY-
-c-M

Gcal displays fixed date messages for every day of the requested period.

The modifiers of a combined/complex/packed short-style fixed date option must be constructed according to following steps, because Gcal treats them as positional parameters:

First step: Representation-of-text-modifier
`a', `A', `e|E', `J', `k', `o', `Q', `U', `x', `z', `Z'

Second step: Period-of-fixed-dates-modifier
`d', `l', `t|T', `w|W|m|M|y|Y[+|-]', `n+|-', `nd', `nw', `*dn[www]', `*wn[www]', `@e|t|dvar[[+|-]n]', `@e|t|dvar[+|-]nwww', `mmdd', `mmwwwn'

If you want to operate with the preceding modifiers, an explicit `-c|C[-]' short-style option must be leading on the one hand, e.g.:

 
-c-t
-cw-
-CZdekloQUzJaxA12+

and only one period defining fixed date period modifier may be given(26).

Or on the other hand, the modifiers must be given as single character options or composed into a single command line word, and additionally either the short-style option `-c|C[-]', `-f|F name[+...]' or `-# line'(27) must be given like:

 
-c -t
-w- -c
-a -Ad -e -kloQUxz -C12+
-F foo.bar -dJZA -l*d10
--here="; Comment" -dZAa

If the modifiers are given as single character options or composed into a single command line word, and one of the `t|T|[w|W|m|M|y|Y[+|-]]' modifiers is used(28), it is unnecessary to give a `-c|C[-]' respectively `-f|F name[+...]' short-style option(29) to activate the fixed date function of Gcal, because it is triggered implicitly by means of these modifiers / alias names.

See section K. Coding Scheme, whose tables explain the relations between the date part (yyyy...) of a resource file line and the modifiers, the short-style option `-c|C[]' --which is used for enabling the fixed date feature-- respectively the long-style option `--period-of-fixed-dates=argument' may have, i.e. they point out all possible correspondences. This is necessary because Gcal does not respect all entries found in a resource file if a fixed date argument is given, it respects only those entries which have a definite relation to the fixed date argument to avoid the output of redundant information!

Fixed date text modifiers and options:

`--biorhythm-axis=number'
The width of the biorhythm text graphics --which can be created by means of the biorhythm text graphics %;[date] special text-- is changed to number characters for each axis of the bar. The number argument must be an integer value between 1...100, the default number of characters is 20. If the number divides 100 with a remainder, it is internally reduced to the nearest number that divides 100 without any remainder. This means, only the numbers 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50 and 100 are factually respected, so a number argument of 19 is internally reduced to 10.

For example:

 
$ cat bio.rc
-| 0*d1#999 %;19620921
$ gcal -fbio.rc %19961212 -s0 -xw --biorhythm-axis=19
-| 
-| Thu, Dec <12th>1996: 0- I       P1 E        +0
-| Fri, Dec  13th 1996: 0-  I   P   1          +0
-| Sat, Dec  14th 1996: 0-    @   E 0          +0
-| Sun, Dec  15th 1996: 0-  P  IE   0          +0
-| Mon, Dec  16th 1996: 0- P  E  I  0          +0
-| Tue, Dec  17th 1996: 1-P  E     I0          +0
-| Wed, Dec  18th 1996: 0- @        1          +0

See section Biorhythm %?[date] special texts, for more details.

`--moonimage-lines=number'
The height of the Moon phase text graphics --which can be created by means of the Moon phase text graphics %Z[date] special text-- is changed to number lines. The number argument must be an integer value between 6...30, the default number of lines is 12.

For example:

 
$ gcal -f/dev/null -#0*d1#999_%Z__%O %19950407 -x --moon=8
-| 
-| Fri, Apr < 7th>1995:          (    @@@@@
-|                          (           @@@@@@@@
-|                       (              @@@@@@@@@@@
-|                      (               @@@@@@@@@@@@
-|                      (               @@@@@@@@@@@@
-|                       (              @@@@@@@@@@@
-|                        (             @@@@@@@@@@
-|                            (        @@@@@@@ 42%+

See section Moon phase %[format]?[date] special texts, for more details.

`a'
`--include-resource-file-name'
Extend fixed date text by the name of the resource file and the line number which the fixed date text comes from, e.g.:

 
Mon, Jan   1st 1995: (`Eternal holiday list'#00003) New Year's day
Mon, Jan   1st 1995: (.gcalrc#00987) No fixed dates
...

`A'
`--alternative-format'
Instead of using the standard list format, e.g.:

 
Mon, Jan   1st 1995: New Year's day
Mon, Jan   1st 1995: No fixed dates
...

Gcal uses the alternative list format, e.g.:

 
Mon, Jan   1st 1995:
New Year's day
No fixed dates
...

`e'
`--include-holidays=long'
Enable inclusion of all built-in eternal holiday dates. This includes legal holidays and memorial days.

`E'
`--include-holidays=short'
Enable inclusion of those built-in eternal holiday dates which are legal holidays only.

`g[text]'
`--grouping-text[=text]'
Group fixed dates by day by using the text separator. If text is not given, the built-in text(30) is used for grouping, e.g.:

 
$ gcal -Cxw -cg
-|
-| Sun, Nov   6th 1994: Text 1
-| Sun, Nov   6th 1994: Text 2
-|
-| Mon, Nov   7th 1994: Text 3
-|
-| Tue, Nov   8th 1994: Text 4
...


$ gcal -Cxw -g'-A_user\_defined-~-grouping text-'
-|
-| Sun, Nov   6th 1994: Text 1
-| Sun, Nov   6th 1994: Text 2
-| -A user_defined-
-| -grouping text-
-| Mon, Nov   7th 1994: Text 3
-| -A user_defined-
-| -grouping text-
-| Tue, Nov   8th 1994: Text 4
...

The text may contain references to global date and text variables (see section Fixed date option `--date-variable=argument', and Fixed date option `--date-variable=argument'). Furthermore, all special texts which cause a text replacement may be used in the text (see section %?... special texts for text replacement).

Each time a `~' (tilde) or `^' (caret) character is found in text, this character is replaced by a real `\n' (newline) character.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `~' (tilde) character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\~'. If you need the `\~' characters themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\_'. All above mentioned facts are also valid for the `^' (caret) character.

Each time a `_' (underscore) character is found in text, this character is replaced by a real ` ' (space) character.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `_' (underscore) character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\_'. If you need the `\_' characters themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\_'.

`k'
`--include-week-number'
The leading date of a fixed date message is either extended by the ISO week number or the standard week number. See section Calendar option `--starting-day=argument', Calendar option `--iso-week-number=yes|no', and Aspects in Internationalization, for further details.

`o'
`--omit-multiple-date-part'
Omit displaying the leading date of a fixed date message in case more than one message refers to that date(31), e.g.:

 
$ gcal -cxo
-|
-| Sun, Nov   6th 1994: Text 1
-|                      Text 2
...

`Q'
`--suppress-fixed-dates-list-separator'
Suppress displaying of the blank line which is always leading a fixed date list. For example, to cause Gcal to print only the number of days between 1st January 1970 and 1st January 1980, you can call the program like this:

 
$ gcal -f /dev/null -QUx %19800101 -#0_%j-2440588
-| 3652

`U'
`--suppress-date-part'
Suppress displaying the leading date of a fixed date message, e.g.:

 
$ gcal -cxU
-|
-| Text 1
-| Text 2
...

`J'
`--suppress-text-part'
Suppress displaying the text part of a fixed date message, e.g.:

 
$ gcal -cxJ
-|
-| Sun, Nov   6th 1994:
-| Sun, Nov   6th 1994:
...

`x'
`--exclude-fixed-dates-list-title'
Suppress the title text line of the fixed date list.

`--heading-text=text'
Changes the title text line of the fixed date list. Instead of displaying the default `Fixed date list:' text, any other text can be used as heading text of the fixed date list, e.g.:

 
$ gcal -cUJ --heading-text=Hello,_it_is_%K_,~%t__o'clock
-|
-| Hello, it is Sunday,
-| 14:32 o'clock
-|
-| Sun, Nov   6th 1994:
...

The text may contain references to global date and text variables (see section Fixed date option `--date-variable=argument', and Fixed date option `--date-variable=argument'). Furthermore, all special texts which cause a text replacement may be used in the text (see section %?... special texts for text replacement).

Each time a `~' (tilde) or `^' (caret) character is found in text, this character is replaced by a real `\n' (newline) character.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `~' (tilde) character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\~'. If you need the `\~' characters themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\_'. All above mentioned facts are also valid for the `^' (caret) character.

Each time a `_' (underscore) character is found in text, this character is replaced by a real ` ' (space) character.

You may depreciate the special meaning of the `_' (underscore) character ---in case this character itself is needed-- by placing a `\' (backslash) character before it, e.g. `\_'. If you need the `\_' characters themselves, you have to protect the `\' (backslash) character by another `\' (backslash) character, e.g. `\\_'.

`z'
`--include-consecutive-number'
Display consecutive numbers of fixed date messages.

`Z'
`--zero-dates-only'
Display only those dates, for which fixed dates do not exist, i.e. all "empty" fixed dates only consisting of the date.

Fixed date period modifiers and options:

`--leap-day=february|march'
The leap day(32) is observed in non-leap years.

`--leap-day=february'
A fixed date that appears in every year and which is related to the leap day, is displayed on the 28th February in non-leap years.

`--leap-day=march'
A fixed date that appears in every year and which is related to the leap day, is displayed on the 1st March in non-leap years.

`d'
`--include-today'
If lists of periods are generated, include the actual date into the list. See section Fixed date option `--list-mode', how to create a list of periods.

`l'
`--list-mode'
Generate a list of periods instead of a single period.

Please note:
The following examples assumes the actual system date is the 17th February of any year (00000217), weeks start on Mondays and ISO week numbers are used!

`--period-of-fixed-dates=argument'

`nd'
`*dn'
Single date of absolute day n == `1...365|366|999' of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option. If the value 999 for n is given, the last day of the year (31st December) is assumed.

`lnd'
`l*dn'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the given day number n) and ending on the n'th absolute day of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`n+|-'
Single date of day actual day `+/-' n days of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`ln+|-'
List dates starting yesterday `-' or tomorrow `+' and ending on actual day `+/-' n days of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`nw'
Single dates of week number n == `0|1...52|53|99' of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cw' option. See section Calendar option `--starting-day=argument', Calendar option `--iso-week-number=yes|no', and Aspects in Internationalization, for more details.

`lnw'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the given week number n) and ending on the first respectively last day of given week number n == `0|1...52|53|99' of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option. See section Calendar option `--starting-day=argument', Calendar option `--iso-week-number=yes|no', and Aspects in Internationalization, for further details.

`mmdd'
Single date of day dd in month mm of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`lmmdd'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in mmdd) and ending on day dd of month mm of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`mmwwwn'
Single date of n'th == `1...5|9' weekday dd|www in month mm of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`lmmwwwn'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in mmwwwn) and ending on n'th == `1...5|9' weekday dd of month mm of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`*dnwww'
Single date of n'th == `1...51|52|53|99' weekday www of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`l*dnwww'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in n) and ending on n'th == `1...51|52|53|99' weekday www of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`*wn[www]'
Single date of weekday www of n'th == `0|1...52|53|99' week of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option. If no weekday www is given, the starting day of the week is assumed for the weekday www. See section Calendar option `--starting-day=argument', Calendar option `--iso-week-number=yes|no', and Aspects in Internationalization, for more details.

`l*wn[www]'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in n) and ending on weekday www of n'th == `0|1...52|53|99' week of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option. If no weekday www is given, the starting day of the week is assumed for the weekday www. See section Calendar option `--starting-day=argument', Calendar option `--iso-week-number=yes|no', and Aspects in Internationalization, for further details.

`@e[[+|-]n]'
Single date of day n relative to the Easter Sunday's date of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`l@e[[+|-]n]'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in n) and ending on n'th day relative to the Easter Sunday's date of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`@e[+|-]nwww'
Single date of n'th weekday www relative to the Easter Sunday's date of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`l@e[+|-]nwww'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in n) and ending on n'th weekday www relative to the Easter Sunday's date of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`@t[[+|-]n]'
Single date of day n relative to today's date of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`l@t[[+|-]n]'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in n) and ending on n'th day relative to today's date of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`@t[+|-]nwww'
Single date of n'th weekday www relative to today's date of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`l@t[+|-]nwww'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in n) and ending on n'th weekday www relative to today's date of the actual year; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`@dvar[[+|-]n]'
Single date of the day n relative to that date of the actual year, which is referenced by the date variable dvar; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`l@dvar[[+|-]n]'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in n) and ending on the n'th day relative to that date of the actual year, which is referenced by the date variable dvar; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`@dvar[+|-]nwww'
Single date of the n'th weekday www relative to that date of the actual year, which is referenced by the date variable dvar; the intensity level is the same as the simple `-c' option.

`l@dvar[+|-]nwww'
List dates starting yesterday or tomorrow (depending on the value given in n) and ending on the n'th weekday www relative to that date of the actual year, which is referenced by the date variable dvar; the intensity level is the same as the `-cy' option.

`t|T'
`--tomorrow' long-style option
List dates related to tomorrow.

`w|W[+|-]'
`--week' long-style option
`--end-of-week' long-style option
`--start-of-week' long-style option
Display dates related to the week.
See section Calendar option `--starting-day=argument'.

`m|M[+|-]'
`--month' long-style option
`--end-of-month' long-style option
`--start-of-month' long-style option
Display dates related to the month.

`y|Y[+|-]'
`--year' long-style option
`--end-of-year' long-style option
`--start-of-year' long-style option
Display dates related to the year.


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