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3.16.4 Article Washing

We call this "article washing" for a really good reason. Namely, the A key was taken, so we had to use the W key instead.

Washing is defined by us as "changing something from something to something else", but normally results in something looking better. Cleaner, perhaps.

See section 4.3 Customizing Articles, if you want to change how Gnus displays articles by default.

C-u g
This is not really washing, it's sort of the opposite of washing. If you type this, you see the article exactly as it exists on disk or on the server.

W l
Remove page breaks from the current article (gnus-summary-stop-page-breaking). See section 4.5 Misc Article, for page delimiters.

W r
Do a Caesar rotate (rot13) on the article buffer (gnus-summary-caesar-message). Unreadable articles that tell you to read them with Caesar rotate or rot13. (Typically offensive jokes and such.)

It's commonly called rot13 because each letter is rotated 13 positions in the alphabet, e. g. `B' (letter #2) -> `O' (letter #15). It is sometimes referred to as "Caesar rotate" because Caesar is rumored to have employed this form of, uh, somewhat weak encryption.

W t
t
Toggle whether to display all headers in the article buffer (gnus-summary-toggle-header).

W v
Toggle whether to display all headers in the article buffer permanently (gnus-summary-verbose-header).

W o
Treat overstrike (gnus-article-treat-overstrike).

W d
Treat M******** sm*rtq**t*s according to gnus-article-dumbquotes-map (gnus-article-treat-dumbquotes). Note that this function guesses whether a character is a sm*rtq**t* or not, so it should only be used interactively.

In reality, this function is translates a subset of the subset of the cp1252 (or Windows-1252) character set that isn't in ISO Latin-1, including the quote characters \222 and \264. Messages in this character set often have a MIME header saying that they are Latin-1.

W w
Do word wrap (gnus-article-fill-cited-article).

You can give the command a numerical prefix to specify the width to use when filling.

W Q
Fill long lines (gnus-article-fill-long-lines).

W C
Capitalize the first word in each sentence (gnus-article-capitalize-sentences).

W c
Translate CRLF pairs (i. e., `^M's on the end of the lines) into LF (this takes care of DOS line endings), and then translate any remaining CRs into LF (this takes care of Mac line endings) (gnus-article-remove-cr).

W q
Treat quoted-printable (gnus-article-de-quoted-unreadable). Quoted-Printable is one common MIME encoding employed when sending non-ASCII (i. e., 8-bit) articles. It typically makes strings like `déjà vu' look like `d=E9j=E0 vu', which doesn't look very readable to me. Note that the this is usually done automatically by Gnus if the message in question has a Content-Transfer-Encoding header that says that this encoding has been done.

W 6
Treat base64 (gnus-article-de-base64-unreadable). Base64 is one common MIME encoding employed when sending non-ASCII (i. e., 8-bit) articles. Note that the this is usually done automatically by Gnus if the message in question has a Content-Transfer-Encoding header that says that this encoding has been done.

W Z
Treat HZ or HZP (gnus-article-decode-HZ). HZ (or HZP) is one common encoding employed when sending Chinese articles. It typically makes strings look like `~{<:Ky2;S{#,NpJ)l6HK!#~}'.

W h
Treat HTML (gnus-article-wash-html). Note that the this is usually done automatically by Gnus if the message in question has a Content-Type header that says that this type has been done.

W f
Look for and display any X-Face headers (gnus-article-display-x-face). The command executed by this function is given by the gnus-article-x-face-command variable. If this variable is a string, this string will be executed in a sub-shell. If it is a function, this function will be called with the face as the argument. If the gnus-article-x-face-too-ugly (which is a regexp) matches the From header, the face will not be shown. The default action under Emacs is to fork off the display program(1) to view the face. Under XEmacs or Emacs 21+ with suitable image support, the default action is to display the face before the From header. (It's nicer if XEmacs has been compiled with X-Face support--that will make display somewhat faster. If there's no native X-Face support, Gnus will try to convert the X-Face header using external programs from the pbmplus package and friends.(2)) If you want to have this function in the display hook, it should probably come last.

W b
Add clickable buttons to the article (gnus-article-add-buttons). See section 3.16.5 Article Buttons.

W B
Add clickable buttons to the article headers (gnus-article-add-buttons-to-head).

W W H
Strip headers like the X-No-Archive header from the beginning of article bodies (gnus-article-strip-headers-from-body).

W E l
Remove all blank lines from the beginning of the article (gnus-article-strip-leading-blank-lines).

W E m
Replace all blank lines with empty lines and then all multiple empty lines with a single empty line. (gnus-article-strip-multiple-blank-lines).

W E t
Remove all blank lines at the end of the article (gnus-article-remove-trailing-blank-lines).

W E a
Do all the three commands above (gnus-article-strip-blank-lines).

W E A
Remove all blank lines (gnus-article-strip-all-blank-lines).

W E s
Remove all white space from the beginning of all lines of the article body (gnus-article-strip-leading-space).

W E e
Remove all white space from the end of all lines of the article body (gnus-article-strip-trailing-space).

See section 4.3 Customizing Articles, for how to wash articles automatically.


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