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5.1.2 Default Includes

Several tests depend upon a set of header files. Since these headers are not universally available, tests actually have to provide a set of protected includes, such as:

 
#if TIME_WITH_SYS_TIME
# include <sys/time.h>
# include <time.h>
#else
# if HAVE_SYS_TIME_H
#  include <sys/time.h>
# else
#  include <time.h>
# endif
#endif

Unless you know exactly what you are doing, you should avoid using unconditional includes, and check the existence of the headers you include beforehand (see section 5.6 Header Files).

Most generic macros provide the following default set of includes:

 
#include <stdio.h>
#if HAVE_SYS_TYPES_H
# include <sys/types.h>
#endif
#if HAVE_SYS_STAT_H
# include <sys/stat.h>
#endif
#if STDC_HEADERS
# include <stdlib.h>
# include <stddef.h>
#else
# if HAVE_STDLIB_H
#  include <stdlib.h>
# endif
#endif
#if HAVE_STRING_H
# if !STDC_HEADERS && HAVE_MEMORY_H
#  include <memory.h>
# endif
# include <string.h>
#endif
#if HAVE_STRINGS_H
# include <strings.h>
#endif
#if HAVE_INTTYPES_H
# include <inttypes.h>
#else
# if HAVE_STDINT_H
#  include <stdint.h>
# endif
#endif
#if HAVE_UNISTD_H
# include <unistd.h>
#endif

If the default includes are used, then Autoconf will automatically check for the presence of these headers and their compatibility, i.e., you don't need to run AC_HEADERS_STDC, nor check for `stdlib.h' etc.

These headers are checked for in the same order as they are included. For instance, on some systems `string.h' and `strings.h' both exist, but conflict. Then HAVE_STRING_H will be defined, but HAVE_STRINGS_H won't.


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